Transitioning Your Child to Middle School

Katie-Pennington-Transitioning-to--Middle-School

As a high school principal with young kids, it’s a nice change to be with a different age group when I come home from work. Although what’s shocking to me is that my oldest son is going to be entering middle school next year! In the blink of an eye, my son will soon be a teenager, just like the kids who I work alongside with every day. You would think that as a high school principal, this transition would be easy for me since I somewhat serve as a guide to hundreds of teenagers. But it’s actually far from that.

You can tell I’m not taking this as well as you would think. So I turned to Google for help to cope with this change in my life. The tips I found were so relatable that I felt like I should write about this on my blog to help other parents like me experiencing this shock.

They Might Want to Get Involved with Extracurricular Activities

Elementary schools often don’t have extra-curricular activities like the school baseball or softball teams. However, middle schools do and this is new territory for parents and kids. Usually your child would catch the bus home after school or your would stay at an after-school program until you could pick them up after work. But extracurricular activities may keep your child after school long after the busses have left for the day. Talk to your child to see if they’re interested to participate in any activities. Chances are they might, and that opens up a whole new topic: ownership of a cell phone to stay in contact with your kids.

Cell Phones

These days it’s common for kids to have a cell phone at this age. Did you know the average age for a child to get a cell phone is 10? And it’s with good reason. Some parents work late, kids stay after school for activities and some going to friend’s houses after school. With your child hopping from place to place, parents still want to keep in contact with their kids.

Children’s cell phone ownership can be tricky, especially if they have a smartphone. It’s like they have access a world you can’t see in their pocket! As a parent, make sure you talk to your child about the proper use of a smartphone and use parental controls. I have some more guidance tips on a past blog I wrote here.

Help Them Adjust

Some elementary schools structure their schedule to have students switch teachers and classrooms throughout the day to help them adjust to middle school. Others do not, and children are stationary in one room all day. Middle school will be a significant change, as students hop from classroom to classroom and they won’t get to know their teachers and peers as well.

Your child will have to learn to self-regulate themselves to get to class. Talk to your child to see if they know where the lunchroom is, where the classrooms are, and how to effectively stop at their locker to switch out materials before the next class begins. Your child will also have to push themselves to make friends, since it might not be as easy as it was in elementary school where almost everyone class was their friend. Reassure your child that everyone his age will be new and everyone is going through the changes too.