Keeping Kids Occupied With Tech: The Right Way

Katie-Pennington-Kids-Technology

It’s hard for kids to stay occupied during the winter. Being stuck inside during a snowstorm is rarely fun for anyone, especially bored kids! In my home state of Michigan, snow is unavoidable and is often the reason why kids don’t want to venture outside. Of course, they would rather hold an iPad in front of the fire instead of freezing their toes off sledding.

I love technology and I embrace the endless possibilities it brings to the classroom. However, we must be mindful about how children use technology. Although it can enhance their communication and hand-eye-coordination skills, it may inhibit other skills. Here are a few ways to implement proper technology use with the kids.

Determine What Needs to Come Before the Technology

Screen time is a privilege, so you must establish your child’s responsibilities beforehand. Let your child know what needs to be accomplished to earn screen time. If you have a young child, something as simple as putting their toys away can help them learn about responsibilities. If your kids are older, having them make the bed or dust the furniture can help as well. Both ways will establish technology as a reward for finishing chores, not something that gets taken away if the chores aren’t done.

In addition, you may want to implement technology-free family time for everyone. You can set aside time each day for no texting, internet surfing, social media checking or email sending to talk about how everyone’s day went. You can also plan a technology-free evening such as a game night or a walk in the park.

Set Time Limits

Too much exposure to a screen isn’t good for anyone, especially young children. According to Psychology Today, too much exposure to electronic media leads to delayed cognitive development in young children. Although technology can do wonders for your child’s education, it’s wise to set a time limit. This can vary depending on their age and self-management level. A recent report from CNN provides some guidelines about how to limit media use for young children.

However, the guidelines for older children and teenagers vary depending on the child and the parent. You can factor in how much sleep they should be getting, their homework load and their maturity level. If your child can self-regulate the technology use on their own, you can give them more flexibility. If you believe your child doesn’t have the self-discipline to regulate use, you may need to step in.

Use Controls

Some video game consoles and smartphones have parental controls built in. These can allow you to restrict internet access, restrict the ability to make purchases and restrict downloads of games with mature ratings. Some devices can be programmed to shut down after they have been powered on for a certain time period.

Technology is a wonderful, but challenging tool. The world is changing so quickly, and therefore it may be hard to accommodate our parenting skills to keep up. We didn’t have all this technology when we were growing up! But I can assure you these tips can help you navigate the complicated mix of parenting and technology.